Caroline Maxson Wood came to the Walla Walla Valley by wagon train in 1859 with her husband, J. Franklin Wood, her parents, Stephen and Lois Maxson, and her three siblings. They settled in the Russell Creek area. Stephen Maxson later brought the first piano to the valley via Cape Horn for his daughter, who became a teacher in the Walla Walla schools and eventually a music teacher at Walla Walla College. Her husband served as superintendent of the Walla Walla school district and was one of the first Seventh-day Adventist evangelists in the area. Caroline Wood is portrayed by Gladys Wentland.

Augusta Moorehouse was a native of Wurtenberg, Germany, who emigrated to the U.S. at the age of nine. In 1861 she, her husband, and eight children came to the Walla Walla region as part of the Morgan wagon train, settling on Birch Creek. She was a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist settler in the Walla Walla valley and was instrumental in founding the first Walla Walla and Milton-Freewater Adventist churches. Her son, Major Lee Moorehouse, was a famed photographer of the West, a Lt. Colonel in the Bannock War, and served as mayor of Pendleton and Indian Agent at the Umatilla Reservation. Augusta Moorehouse is portrayed by Cleo Forgey,

Ellen White is said to have experienced many visions. She will tell visitors about some of them and how they were accepted by the people back in her time. White was in the area for a camp meeting in 1879. Eight different miniatures will help illustrate the Seventh Day Adventist story and include a covered wagon representing the way Woods and Moorehouse arrived in the Walla Walla Valley, a store from that time period, the camp meeting scene, and the first Seventh-day Adventist church in the Northwest, which happens to be located in Walla Walla. Ellen White is portrayed by Sandra Ehrhardt.